Biblical Paleoarcheology

Website Relaunch

To those who have followed my blog posts in the past, I want to say, “thank you” for the encouragement, and I hope you will choose to stay with me. After a hiatus of more that I year, I want to start introducing the subject that has really been on my heart. Studying Old Testament history was helpful to my faith, but not nearly as much as history before history, that is, our illusive origins.

I have determined that faith depends upon the historical reliability of the Bible. Some degree of work is being done in defending the Bible’s historical veracity during the historical era, but little has been done for the time before that. In September 2019, I began writing a book about this period, entitled Excavating Babel: Biblical Archeology applied to the Origins of Urbanization. My research looks at the beginning of civilization in the Near East. From a Biblical chronology, this would be the time between Noah (2350 BC) and Abraham (2000 BC). Does archeology support a such a short timeframe? Do settlements, migrations, DNA, and populations fit the Biblical model? My research says they do.

My approach seeks to establish the facts and avoid endless debates. Our ignorance is the biggest problem. Secularists dismiss the Bible as myth, while believers avoid archeology as confusing and unimportant. In truth, the Bible sets guidelines for archeology, and archeology fleshes out the Bible. Beyond facts, the Bible and archeology together define morality for the past and the present, which is often overlooked. We can even find practical applications our personal lives.

The notification for my first post did not go out, which is why I am writing this follow-up. Hopefully, it will work, along with subsequent weekly posts. I intend to keep articles short and only send them out once a week, on weekends. I know I can only stand to read a few paragraphs of most articles myself, so you should not need to endure more than that from me.

It does take time to maintain a website and blog while doing research, writing a book, and playing pickleball. Financially, I must pay for the website, for books, and for sources such as JSTOR and Academia, that have ongoing monthly charges. The time and money will be worth as more people become informed and confident about our rich ancestral heritage. Comment, e-mail me, tell others, and especially pray.

Don’t forget to read the first article from last Sunday that introduced Biblical Archeology.

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