Biblical Paleoarcheology

Where Did the Ark Land?

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Article #21 Civilization began in the Near East, in the Fertile Crescent. This is the point that I have been making so far. Everyone agrees with this. Many would place Neanderthals and scattered human fossils earlier in time, but these remains represent migrating groups and not civilization. Let’s not debate so-called pre-civilization fossils at this […]

Biblical Paleoarcheology

The Pottery that Dominated the World

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Article #20 Was the city of Babel a real place? Why is it so difficult to find it? The answer may be that we’ve been looking in the wrong place. Pottery provides the best evidence for the existence of Babel, and the key to this mystery has been in plain sight for decades. Some archeologists […]

Biblical Paleoarcheology

The Pottery Puzzle

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Article #19 Archeologists use pottery, more than anything, to assign sequence to early settlements. Pottery styles are supposed to have improved over thousands of years from areas of no pottery to the most ornate pottery. Such a sequence, however, is based on an enthusiasm to embrace the theory of human evolution rather than empirical facts. […]

Biblical Paleoarcheology

The First Mining Industry

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Article 18 Many misconceptions about the so-called “Stone Age” need to be corrected because they are disparaging to the Bible and Christian faith. The use of stone does not imply that people were primitive. Pictures of Neanderthals banging rocks together to make tools wrongly gives the idea that the earliest humans were not smart enough […]

Biblical Paleoarcheology

The First Animal Husbandry

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Article #17 Wikipedia gives the following definition to animal husbandry: Animal husbandry is the branch of agriculture concerned with animals that are raised for meat, fibre, milk, eggs, or other products. It includes day-to-day care, selective breeding and the raising of livestock. Husbandry has a long history, starting with the Neolithic revolution when animals were first domesticated, from around 13,000 BC onwards, antedating farming of […]

Biblical Paleoarcheology

The First Farmers

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Article #16 The first farming has long been considered the key to understanding the history of human origins. Interestingly, this holds true for the Biblical model as well as the secular model. Archeologists have diligently sought out the location of the first farms as an indication of the transition for hunter-gatherers who supposedly domesticated grain […]

Biblical Paleoarcheology

The First Family

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Article #15 No, this is not about the president and his wife. Neither is it about Adam and Eve, who left no archeological footprint. The first family of us all is Noah, his wife, and his children. Now, there is a family that left visible traces throughout the world.   All social morality today is […]

Biblical Paleoarcheology

A New Beginning

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Article #14 As Pat and I begin the new year of 2021, we are in Virginia, learning about the New Beginning that our nation experienced. The historical exhibits of Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown have amazed me far beyond my expectations. There is so much to see here, and so much history to learn. English colonists […]

Biblical Paleoarcheology

The First Christmas

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Article #13 When did people first start celebrating the birth of Christ? Did it begin as a pagan festival of the winter solstice? Did it begin with the shepherds and wise men, Anna and Simeon, who worshipped the child born to save us? Or did it begin with the promise to Eve that One of […]

Biblical Paleoarcheology

The Tender Mercies of Babel

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Article #12 Last week, we saw how kingship began at Eridu/Babel. Did God punish Babel by confusing the languages? Words like punishment or judgment are not mentioned in this account. The Flood was a punishment for violence. A world of people died. No one died at Babel, certainly not as a result of speaking different […]